Posts Tagged ‘census

23
Dec
10

2010 Census – My How We’ve Grown

The Census Bureau released the United States population and change data on Tuesday, more than a week before their constitutional mandate of delivering the data to the President by December 31 (but, did they do it under budget is what I want to know!). This first set of data is what is used to reapportion the seats in the House of Representatives. Some figures to note:

Total U.S. resident  population = 308,745,538, an increase of 9.7 percent over the 2000 U.S. resident population of 281,421,906.

The most populous state was California (37,253,956); the least populous, Wyoming (563,626).

The state that gained the most (numerically) since the 2000 Census was Texas (up 4,293,741 to 25,145,561) and the state that gained the most as a percentage of its 2000 Census count was Nevada (up a whopping 35.1% to 2,700,551).

Regionally, the South and the West picked up the bulk of the population increase, 14,318,924 and 8,747,621, respectively – and thus the bulk of the reapportioned House seats. But the Northeast and the Midwest also grew at a modest rate: 1,722,862 and 2,534,225.

The only area to lose population? Puerto Rico’s resident population was 3,725,789, a 2.2 percent decrease from a decade earlier.

See an interesting interactive map on the US Census site (I’d embed the interactive version here, but WordPress doesn’t support it, so you’ll have to settle for a static version).



Census Apportionment Map

US Census House of Representatives Apportionment

So how do they figure out this puzzle anyway? The apportionment totals were calculated by a congressionally defined formula (Title 2 of the U.S. Code if you want to look it up), to divide among the states the 435 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. The apportionment population consists of the resident population of the 50 states, plus the overseas military and federal civilian employees and their dependents living with them who could be allocated to a state. Each member of the House represents, on average, about 710,000 people. The populations of the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico are excluded from the apportionment population, since they do not have voting seats in Congress. Can you say “taxation without representation”? See a nifty little video about apportionment here. The apportionment only defines the number of seats, however. How the districts within each state are defined is another matter altogether and requires a little lesson in gerrymandering that we’ll not get in to here. Suffice it to say that it’s an interesting if not convoluted and sometimes hotly debated process.

So, thanks to the Census Bureau, we get to revel in these little nuggets of data while we drink our egg nog and warm our feet by the fire (or dip our feet in the pool, in the case of my Santa Barbara compatriots). Happy Holidays everyone!

Source: US Census Bureau

24
Nov
10

Thanksgiving Geography

While noshing on the feast set before you this holiday, amaze your family with these nuggets of Thanksgiving Day knowledge from the US Census Bureau:

3

Number of places in the United States named after the holiday’s traditional main course. Turkey, Texas, was the most populous in 2009, with 445 residents, followed by Turkey Creek, La. (362) and Turkey, N.C. (272). There are also nine townships around the country named Turkey, three in Kansas.
Source: Census Factfinder and Population estimates

5

Number of places and townships in the United States that are named Cranberry or some spelling variation of the red, acidic berry (e.g., Cranbury, N.J.), a popular side dish at Thanksgiving. Cranberry township (Butler County), Pa., was the most populous of these places in 2009, with 27,560 residents. Cranberry township (Venango County), Pa., was next (6,774).
Source: Census Factfinder and Population estimates

28

Number of places in the United States named Plymouth, as in Plymouth Rock, the landing site of the first Pilgrims. Plymouth, Minn., is the most populous, with 72,849 residents in 2009; Plymouth, Mass., had 56,842. There is just one township in the United States named “Pilgrim.” Located in Dade County, Mo., its population was 126 in 2009. And then there is Mayflower, Ark., whose population was 2,257 in 2009.
Source: Census Factfinder and Population estimates

117 million

Number of households across the nation — all potential gathering places for people to celebrate the holiday.
Source: Families and Living Arrangements: 2009

$3.6 billion

The value of turkeys shipped in 2002. Arkansas led the way in turkey shipments, with $581.5 million, followed by Virginia ($544.2 million) and North Carolina ($453 million). In 2002, poultry businesses with a primary product of turkey totaled 35 establishments, employing about 17,000 people.
Source: Poultry Processing: 2002

$7.3 million

The value of U.S. imports of live turkeys from January through July of 2010 — 99.1 percent from Canada. When it comes to sweet potatoes, the Dominican Republic was the source of 62.1 percent ($3.4 million) of total imports ($5.5 million). The United States ran a $3.9 million trade deficit in live turkeys during the period but had a surplus of $31.5 million in sweet potatoes.
Source: Foreign Trade Statistics

47 million

The preliminary estimate of turkeys Minnesota expected to raise in 2010. The Gopher State was tops in turkey production, followed by North Carolina (31.0 million), Arkansas (28.0 million), Missouri (17.5 million), Indiana (16.0 million) and Virginia (15.5 million). These six states together would probably account for about two-thirds of U.S. turkeys produced in 2010.

735 million pounds

The forecast for U.S. cranberry production in 2010. Wisconsin is expected to lead all states in the production of cranberries, with 435 million pounds, followed by Massachusetts (195 million). New Jersey, Oregon and Washington are also expected to have substantial production, ranging from 14 million to 53 million pounds.

1.9 billion pounds

The total weight of sweet potatoes — another popular Thanksgiving side dish — produced by major sweet potato producing states in 2009. North Carolina (940 million pounds) produced more sweet potatoes than any other state. It was followed by California (592 million pounds) and Louisiana (162 million pounds).

931 million pounds

Total production of pumpkins produced in the major pumpkin-producing states in 2009. Illinois led the country by producing 429 million pounds of the vined orange gourd. Pumpkin patches in California and Ohio also provided lots of pumpkins: Each state produced at least 100 million pounds. The value of all pumpkins produced by major pumpkin-producing states was $103 million.

If you prefer cherry pie, you will be pleased to learn that the nation’s forecasted tart cherry production for 2010 totals 195 million pounds, albeit 46 percent below 2009’s forecasted total. Of this 2010 total, the overwhelming majority (140 million) will be produced in Michigan.

2.2 billion bushels

The total volume of wheat — the essential ingredient of bread, rolls and pie crust — produced in the United States in 2010. North Dakota and Kansas accounted for 33 percent of the nation’s wheat production.

736,680 tons

The 2010 contracted production of snap (green) beans in major snap (green) bean-producing states. Of this total, Wisconsin led all states (326,900 tons). Many Americans consider green bean casserole a traditional Thanksgiving dish.
Source: The previous data came from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service

 




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